Our Members

Member blogs for International Women and Girls in Science

February 11th has been adopted by the United National General Assembly as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, to help educate, mobilise political will and resources to address an important global problem, as well as celebrating the achievements that have been made so far.

To quote UN Secretary-General Antรณnio Guterres, โ€˜To rise to the challenges of the 21st century, we need to harness our full potential. That requires dismantling gender stereotypesโ€™. Science and gender equality are key international development goals and intrinsically interlinked, especially in the climate crisis. However, women and girls still do not participate fully in science globally or in this country, especially at senior levels. Less than 30 per cent of researchers worldwide are women.

To celebrate this day in 2021 we have invited some of our members to write blogs describing what motivated them to pursue a STEM career, to reflect on the past or to comment on the future. Click on each of the tiles below to read their stories.

Click the above tile to read their blog. "My gender is not a disadvantage I need to overcome. Rather, our culture needs to change so that STEM is an inclusive environment for everyone." Dr. Penelope Maher, Research Fellow, University of Exeter.

Click the above tile to read their blog. "The main things Iโ€™ve learned throughout my scientific career to date are that studying science opens up an enormous range of career opportunities." Dr. Helena Lewis, Foundation Scientist- Defence Applications, Met Office.

Click the above tile to read their blog. "Seeing a gender imbalance in STEM subjects should not be the norm." Andrea Rochner, PhD Candidate, University of Exeter

Click the above tile to read their blog. "While society might be telling us that girls can study what they want, outdated views [of women] are still sadly entrenched in education." Ruth Chapman, PhD Candidate, University of Exeter

Click the above tile to read their blog. "My childhood dreams were all strongly shaped by a love of the outdoors and a passion to do what I could to make the world a better place." Dr. Ruth Chapman, Research Fellow, University of Exeter

Click the above tile to read their blog. "We live in a world where our perceived gender (and other visible features) influences how people are treated and therefore how they tend to behave." Dr. Freya Garry, Climate Scientist, Met Office

Click the above tile to read their blog. "I work in STEM because I am fascinated by the world around me" Dr. Susan leadbetter, Senior Scientist, Met Office